My life in North Korea vs South Korea

Image: North Korean boomerang defector said life in South Korea was ‘hell’

One year ago I went on a strictly guided 7 day-tour in North Korea where they took away my passport and did not allow me to explore anything on my own. North Korea was definitely the weirdest country I had ever visited and throughout that trip I kept wondering what life was like in the neighboring South Korea, because it used to be the same country just over 60 years ago.

To answer my questions, this year I traveled to South Korea and made this video, where I compare my time in the North and my time in the South. I still have a lot of questions about the whole situation, but one thing was clear – the daily lives of the Korean people couldn’t be any more different than they are right now.

My Daily Life In NORTH KOREA (MYSTERIOUS 7 DAY TRIP)

I’ve always been very interested in North Korea because it seemed to be one of the most unique and mysterious countries in the whole world. This is my day to day life throughout the 7 days that I spent in North Korea. You can never be sure whether things were staged or not in North Korea because you are only shown what they want you to see. You can’t choose where or when you will be going to specific places, they simply tell you to hop on a bus and ask you to get off at one point or another.

That is why I didn’t want to offer my opinion about whether things were staged or not, whether they were good or not, or honest or not. My goal was to show you what my day to day life looked like when I was there and let you make up your own mind and judge for yourself.

Do not judge North Korea only from what you see in this video. This is what they showed us and there’s a reason they show some things and not show the others. Also, knowing how much control they exercise over the population, everything could have been staged only for us.

The North Korea I wasnt meant to see

My military minder tells me to turn my camera off and it soon becomes clear why.

The poverty I see through the bus window is not the view of North Korea the regime wants to be seen. We are traveling from Hyangsan, three hours north of Pyongyang back to the capital but the main road and the sanctioned route has been flooded. This is the only way back.

Buildings are in disrepair, some barely look inhabitable.

Residents of this small town walk or sit by the side of the road, many seeming to have little to do. A number of official-looking men dressed in brown Mao suits stand silently on street corners. It is impossible to know who they are or which element of the party or military they might work for but they clearly seem to be observing.

Despite the driver traveling as quickly as possible through these inhabited areas, you could still sense the local community being monitored.

Dozens of men are working on the outskirts of town, building a stone wall between their crops and the swollen river.

Boulders and stones are carried by hand and stacked without adhesive. This intensive labor force is seen repeatedly in the North Korean countryside, but I see no heavy equipment to help building or farming.

One man trims hedges with a rusty scythe, other men repair part of the pavement with small hand held pick axes.

Cars are rare, most people either walk or cycle.

Inside North Korea – New Documentary 2017

Life In North Korea – 2017

Related

After Trump’s Tough Talk, Chicken Kim Jong Un Backs Down!

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un has recently backed down on his threats, and stated that he would not attempt to strike Guam with intercontinental ballistic missiles.

Despite a bit of ego-boosting in his statement, in which he still attempted a little bit of tough talk, Kim Jong-un made it abundantly clear that his threats were hollow, and it appears that he has backed down.

This is such a shining example of President Trump’s strong leadership, and a it goes to show that his strength and refusal to back down from a bully were exactly what was needed in dealing with North Korea.

Unlike Obama, whose foreign policy was embarrassing and seen as weakness by the rest of the world, President Trump sends a strong message: America will not tolerate threats, nor will we be pushed around.

Not surprisingly, however, the mainstream media is almost completely ignoring this, and are no doubt desperately trying to spin the situation to marginalize President Trump’s role in things.

Rather than give our President the credit he’s due, the media has largely been silent thus far.

After weeks of mocking Trump for his “harsh” rhetoric, and with some media personnel outright siding with Kim Jong-un, the mainstream media owes our president an apology to go along with the praise he deserves.

We won’t be holding our breath waiting for that, however.

Ref.: http://truthfeed.com/art-of-the-deal-after-trumps-tough-talk-kim-jong-un-backs-down/101211/

North Korea is executing, torturing and enslaving those who practice religion, US says in new report

The North Korean regime has continued to position itself as the one of the world’s worst persecutors of the religious, torturing and killing people who practice their faith, according to a new State Department report released Tuesday.

The 2016 Annual Report on International Religious Freedom determined that the government led by dictator Kim Jong Un continues to delineate brutal punishments for those who engage in faith-bound acts outside of worshipping the country’s leadership. The punishment includes “executions, torture, beatings and arrests.”

“An estimated 80,000 to 120,000 political prisoners, some imprisoned for religious reasons, were believed to be held in the political prison camp system in remote areas under horrific conditions,” the report stated.

North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un watches a military drill marking the 85th anniversary of the establishment of the Korean People's Army (KPA) in this handout photo by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) made available on April 26, 2017. KCNA/Handout via REUTERS      ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. - RTS13Y8S

Kim Jong Un watches a military drill marking the 85th anniversary of the establishment of the Korean People’s Army, in April.  (KCNA/Handout via REUTERS)

A 2016 census released by the Korea Statistical Information Service estimates that 16 percent of the country’s population is Buddhist, 20 percent Protestant and 8 percent Roman Catholic. Some 56 percent claims no religious adherence.

Ironically however, the North Korean constitution states that all citizens have freedom of religion and there shall be no discrimination in political, economic, social or cultural life on account of religion.

The U.S has designated North Korea as a Country of Particular Concern under the International Religious Freedom Act. The latest report comes at a time when relations between the United States and the hermit country have reached an all-time boiling point, with threats of nuclear conflict escalating sharply last week as leaders for the two governments traded barbs.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson says the Trump administration remains interested in a dialogue with Kim but is waiting for some sign of interest from Pyongyang. Speaking to reporters at the State Department on Tuesday, Tillerson said he had no comment on North Korea’s latest pronouncement that it had completed plans to test ballistic missiles near the U.S. Pacific territory of Guam but would not immediately carry it out.

Ref.: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/08/15/north-korea-is-executing-torturing-and-enslaving-those-who-practice-religion-us-says-in-new-report.html

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