A boy watched Russians kill his parents. Will it be considered a war crime?


Andriy Bliznyuk, 10, has been unable to sleep alone since Russian soldiers slaughtered his parents in front of him shortly after the invasion started.
Oleksandr Chernoval, his maternal grandfather, described him as “a damaged child.”
Andriy, his mother Oksana, father Mykhailo Bliznyuk, and uncle Serhiy Salivon allegedly came upon a column of Russian tanks on March 1 while attempting to flee the advance of the invading forces close to the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv.
Andriy claims that one of the tanks rammed into their brown Audi, crushing it along with them all. He claims that after waving his hand from the crushed automobile, Russian soldiers removed him from it in an odd show of mercy. Then, according to him, they started firing machine guns at the automobile.
Andriy claims he recalls lying on the side of the road watching the automobile catch fire. He had lost his mother, father, and uncle. He claims that a stranger discovered him and took him to a hospital.
Oleksandr Chernoval, his maternal grandfather, described him as “a damaged child.” Andriy, his mother Oksana, father Mykhailo Bliznyuk, and uncle Serhiy Salivon allegedly came upon a column of Russian tanks on March 1 while attempting to flee the advance of the invading forces close to the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv.
The Bliznyuk family’s car was smashed by a Russian tank, killing both of the parents.
Andriy claims that one of the tanks rammed into their brown Audi, crushing it along with them all. He claims that after waving his hand from the crushed automobile, Russian soldiers removed him from it in an odd show of mercy. Then, according to him, they started firing machine guns at the automobile.
Andriy claims he recalls lying on the side of the road watching the automobile catch fire. He had lost his mother, father, and uncle. He claims that a stranger discovered him and took him to a hospital.

Andriy has spent several nights next to his grandfather since that day six months ago. His grandma Kateryna Chernoval cries as she explains, “He is scared of anything in the home – doors, curtains, or shutters — being open.” She went on to say that he requires someone to stand next to him in the bathroom because he is too afraid to use it alone.
There were no other witnesses to his family’s deaths than Andriy. Family members were able to bury the remains of their dear ones when the wreckage was cleared. According to Ukrainian authorities, a possible war crime is being looked into in this occurrence.
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Before and after
Andriy assists his grandma in picking strawberries and spring onions in Sofiivka, a village some 50 miles east of Kiev, while donning a green long-sleeved Gap sweatshirt.
He resided in the Brovary neighborhood of Kyiv before the war with his mother and father. He explains with a smile that he enjoyed school, especially math, physical education, and computer science studies. The fourth-grader went fishing with his father and kept pet turtles and a huge collection of toy automobiles.
Andriy remembers how his mother would drive him to school, and his eyes light up. Later, she let him to cross the street by himself. He remembers that Mom tended flowers and that his father enjoyed working on cars.
When questioned about that fateful morning on March 1, he picks at his fingers and his smile changes to nervousness. His older sister Tetyana Muravska, 26, who is now his legal guardian, makes him more reserved and avoids questions about his new life.
Andriy never cries while the adults around him sob freely as they discuss how his parents passed away. When asked how he is doing, he replies, “Everything is fine.”
Despite the fact that Muravska, a mother of a 6-year-old girl, believes her brother has a general understanding of what has happened and that his parents won’t be returning, She claimed that he doesn’t discuss it or his feelings very much. Muravska claims that “during the day, he is out like a typical child.” “He talks to his buddies, plays soccer, and runs.”
Pictures of a happy family ushering in the new year, enjoying a birthday, or taking road trips to the beach are all over their parents’ Brovary house.
Andriy Bliznyuk, 10, has been unable to sleep alone since Russian soldiers slaughtered his parents in front of him shortly after the invasion started. Oleksandr Chernoval, his maternal grandfather, described him as “a damaged child.”

 

Andriy, his mother Oksana, father Mykhailo Bliznyuk, and uncle Serhiy Salivon allegedly came upon a column of Russian tanks on March 1 while attempting to flee the advance of the invading forces close to the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv.
The Bliznyuk family’s car was smashed by a Russian tank, killing both of the parents.
Andriy claims that one of the tanks rammed into their brown Audi, crushing it along with them all. He claims that after waving his hand from the crushed automobile, Russian soldiers removed him from it in an odd show of mercy. Then, according to him, they started firing machine guns at the automobile.
Andriy claims he recalls lying on the side of the road watching the automobile catch fire. He had lost his mother, father, and uncle. He claims that a stranger discovered him and took him to a hospital.
Andriy claims he recalls lying on the side of the road watching the automobile catch fire. He had lost his mother, father, and uncle. He claims that a stranger discovered him and took him to a hospital.
In the early weeks of the war, tales of crimes in the territories outside of Kiev and pictures of dead people wearing civilian clothing provoked cries for justice from the United States and its allies.
Muravska expresses her hope that someone would discover what really happened to her parents.
She claims that even if there is justice, she would not feel complete again.
She claims, “No one will give me my parents back.”
For as long as they can, her grandparents have agreed to assist her in caring for Andriy, but they are worried about his recurring phobias and psychological trauma.
Regarding her grandchild, Kateryna claims, “He will never get better.”
Oleksandr, however, is more upbeat. He claims that Andriy is gradually displaying indications of returning to normal, including riding his bike with his pals in the village.
Still, he said, “He’ll never be better than he was before.” We’ll be by his side, she said.

REFERENCES:

By: Miss Cherry May Timbol – Independent Reporter

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