Pacific Ocean set to make way for world’s next supercontinent


A possible Amasia configuration 280 Myr into the future. Credit: Curtin University


Amasia, the world’s next supercontinent, will undoubtedly form when the Pacific Ocean closes in 200 to 300 million years, according to research done by New Curtin College.

The research team, as reported in the National Science Evaluation, used a supercomputer to simulate the formation of a supercontinent and discovered that as the Earth cools over billions of years, the thickness and strength of the plates under the oceans decrease over time, making it more difficult for another supercontinent to form. through the closure of “younger” oceans like the Atlantic or Indian Oceans.

The study’s principal investigator, Dr. Chuan Huang of Curtin’s Earth Dynamics Research Group and College of Earth and Planetary Sciences, said the new results are significant because they shed light on what will happen to Earth over the next 200 million years.

“Over the previous 2 billion years, Earth’s continents have collided to type a supercontinent each 600 million years, referred to as the supercontinent cycle. Which means that the present continents are as a result of rejoin in just a few hundred million years.” ” mentioned Dr. Huang.

“The resulting new supercontinent has already been given the name Amasia because some believe that when America and Asia crash, the Pacific Ocean would close (as opposed to the Atlantic and Indian Oceans). Australia is likely to play a role in this significant planetary event, first colliding with Asia, then bridging the Americas and Asia as the Pacific Ocean shuts.

“By simulating how the Earth’s tectonic plates are anticipated to develop utilizing a supercomputer, we had been capable of present that in lower than 300 million years the Pacific Ocean is prone to shut, permitting for the formation of Amasia and debunking some earlier scientific idea.”


RELATED: First clues to the start of Earth’s supercontinent cycle found

https://phys.org/news/2021-03-clues-earth-supercontinent.html


What’s remained of the Panthalassa superocean, which began to form 700 million years ago when the last supercontinent began to break up, is the Pacific Ocean. It is the oldest ocean we currently have on Earth, and it has started to get smaller since the time of the dinosaurs. Its current size of roughly 10,000 kilometers is estimated to shrink by only a few centimeters per year, and it will take between 200 and 300 million years for it to completely close.

Zheng-Xiang Li, a co-author and John Curtin Distinguished Professor at Curtin’s College of Earth and Planetary Sciences, noted that the Earth’s biosphere and atmosphere would have undergone significant changes if a single continental mass had controlled the entire planet.

What’s remained of the Panthalassa superocean, which began to form 700 million years ago when the last supercontinent began to break up, is the Pacific Ocean. It is the oldest ocean we currently have on Earth, and it has started to get smaller since the time of the dinosaurs. Its current size of roughly 10,000 kilometers is estimated to shrink by only a few centimeters per year, and it will take between 200 and 300 million years for it to completely close.

Zheng-Xiang Li, a co-author and John Curtin Distinguished Professor at Curtin’s College of Earth and Planetary Sciences, noted that the Earth’s biosphere and atmosphere would have undergone significant changes if a single continental mass had controlled the entire planet.


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By: Miss Cherry May Timbol – Independent Reporter

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